Dachlclocks

Sold:

Dachlclocks

As with the laterndlclocks, the term ‘dachlclocks’ was not used at the time the clocks were manufactured. These regulators were called ‘wall clock’, ‘astronomical clock’ or simply ‘pendulum clock’ depending on the technical version. Clocks with a duration of one year were promoted and described as ‘year duration clocks’ in the ads of ‘Wiener Zeitung’ (Viennese newspaper) during the Biedermeier peiod. This rather simplified type of clock case was mainly manufactured after 1830 and its well-balanced appearance did not change until the mid-19th century. The later cases feature carved tops, capitals, columns and ornamentation. The veneer wood used is mostly mahogany veneer, walnut, and occasionally cherry, as is the case with laterndlclocks. Josef Elsner, who usually produced movements with an eight day duration and mostly Huygen’s winding, commissioned his cabinet maker to mainly use regional walnut. As this master was extremely productive, he can be considered one of the first industrialist clockmakers. The type of movements used in Dachclocks were used also in ‘Brettlclocks’ and laterndlclocks but in no other styles.

The clock movements and pendulums of dachlclocks are as diverse as with other regulators and can have up to a year duration when clock cases are up to 180 cm long and have seconds beating pendulums. The precision of clock movements is very high and the accuracy of precision clocks often amounts to a maximum of one second per day. Elaborate clock movements are very rare, but Ignaz Marenzeller has made a regulator in the form of a big dachlclock with astronomical indication from the centre as well as a striking mechanism, eight endless ropes and a seconds pendulum. The clock is part of the clock collection ‘Dum Hodin’ in Karlštejn, South of Prague. Due to the simplicity of the case and its modern appearance, this type of clock is very popular and fits in well with modern living spaces.